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5 Tips for Keeping Well on Your Expedition Cruise

5 Tips for Keeping Well on Your Expedition Cruise

Two of the most common questions we get asked are, how to avoid seasickness while travelling to Antarctica, and what happens if you become ill during your voyage.

Here are some of the best tips we can offer, since we have a little bit of experience with this ourselves.

1. Preventing sea sickness
Most ANTARCTICA XXI trips skip the navigation across the stormy Drake Passage by flying over it. Those trips that avoid the long navigation from South America to Antarctica are the best option if you are prone to seasickness. Seasickness will not be a concern for the great majority of travellers on those trips.

Under most circumstances, navigation in Antarctica is rather smooth, and while storms are possible the sea passages are short and any exposure to motion is limited. ANTARCTICA XXI does offer the Antarctica Express Air-Cruise itinerary that navigates one-way across the Drake Passage, while flying in the opposite direction. Travellers considering Antarctica Express trips should be prepared for the possibility of rough navigation across the Drake Passage and consequently they should be prepared for the possibility of experiencing seasickness.

Different people react differently to the motion a ship. If you are prone to motion or seasickness, we advise that you speak with your family physician, or your pharmacist, before you depart for South America. They may recommend or prescribe anti-nausea medication in the form of tablets, liquid or even patches. It’s best to purchase this medication in your home country prior to departure, to ensure you secure exactly what has been recommended to you. If you are prone to motion or seasickness we recommend reserving a cabin on a lower deck, towards the middle of the ship where possible.

2. Prescription medication
If your physician prescribes motion sickness medication, or if you take any type of prescription medication, we recommend you bring an extra supply with you, in the off chance that your trip has to be extended for any reason. Also, remember to carry your medication with you on board flights rather than carrying it in your checked luggage. That way it will be accessible to you should your trip or luggage experience a delay.

3. Onboard doctor and medical clinic
On board both (and soon, all three!) of our ships, we offer a medical clinic and a physician with experience in emergency medicine. This is to ensure that the crew and the passengers on board have access to basic medical care during their voyage. When you fill out our medical questionnaire, please be sure to answer honestly and in as much detail as possible; this ensures that our medical staff can prepare for each guest as best they can.

4. Exercise facilities
We know changing your routine can be difficult, so our ships are also equipped with small, but adequate, exercise facilities. Small weights, treadmills and bicycles are available, as well as other types of exercise equipment. Speak with one of our expedition team members once you board your voyage to find out where the gym is located on board. Walking rounds on deck is also something many of our passengers enjoy.

5. Every level of activity

It is our mission to provide every guest with the best possible memories of their time in Antarctica. Not everyone on your voyage will share the same level of physical ability or energy, so we strive to offer options so that everyone can enjoy their time on land. Whether you prefer to sit on the beach and watch the wildlife waddle, fly or swim by; or whether you choose to go on a hike to enjoy a view of the whole landing site, the choice will be yours and expedition team members will be happy to guide you.

Wishing you safe and healthy travels to Antarctica, and around the globe!